Tag Archives: gin and tonic

Brockmans G&T

With the tag line “A Gin Like No Other,” how could I refuse a cocktail kit from Brockmans Gin, a new-ish gin out of the U.K.? Sign me up!

Brockmans uses an interesting mix of botanicals, including almonds, berries and cassia bark (not dissimilar to cinnamon). What’s more, the gin came with tonic, so I really had no excuse not to pour myself a G&T.

It's G&T time!

A cocktail kit with tonic included. Nice!

But first, I sampled the Brockmans on its own. Though I found it a tad fruity and floral for my taste, I appreciate what they are doing with this gin. Dried and wild blueberries and blackberries add sweet berry notes that compete for prominence with the more bitter, piney juniper berries. It’s smooth overall, but it may taste foreign to gin drinkers accustomed to a drier, more herbaceous style of gin. What Brockmans will gain are new gin drinkers whose palates veer to sweet, and those looking for a break from tradition.

The cocktail kit came with a wee bottle of Fever Tree tonic, a lovely, citrusy tonic, also from the U.K. Other Brockmans botanicals include lemon peel and orange peel, so it was well-matched with the Fever Tree. In lieu of the recommended twist of pink grapefruit peel (see recipe), I squeezed in a bit of lime. Then I dropped in some frozen blueberries, which bled pink into the drink and made it look very pretty.

But how did it taste? Good, if fruitier than I’m used to, though its berry taste made me pine for a summer patio rather than a dark Novembver living room. And in hindsight, the grapefruit would have been better than lime. Next time!

Blueberries make a sweet and pretty garnish in this fruit-forward G&T.

Blueberries make a sweet and pretty garnish in this fruit-forward G&T.

Brockmans G&T

  • 2 oz Brockmans Gin
  • 4 oz Fever Tree tonic
  • Grapefruit twist
  • Blueberries (3-5)

Method: Build the drink in a rocks glass filled with ice, stir. Garnish with a pink grapefruit twist and blueberries.

— Recipe courtesy Brockmans Gin

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Drink of the Week: Blackberry & Mint G&T

The leaves are just past their peak, hinting at cold weather to come, but this sweet stretch of Indian summer calls for a gin and tonic! I propose this lovely berry twist on the classic, with a handful of mint from your outdoor planter before a killing frost claims it.

The taste of summer transitions to fall with the addition of Creme de Cassis.

The G&T taste of summer transitions to fall with the addition of Creme de Cassis.

Blackberry & Mint G&T

  • Juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 5 mint leaves
  • 1/2 oz Creme de Cassis
  • 2 oz gin
  • Top tonic
  • Garnish: Two blackberries and a mint sprig

Method: In a tall glass, muddle mint leaves with lime and Creme de Cassis. Add gin, fill the glass with ice, then top with tonic. Stir. Garnish with two blackberries and a mint sprig.

Drink of the Week: Parlour Gin & Tonic

It seems incredible I have not yet blogged about the G&T. I have written about gin and tonics for both Avenue magazine and most recently for the Calgary Herald, yet for some reason summer’s eponymous sip has yet to be featured as my Drink of the Week. Until now.

It's gin and tonic time! Try this refreshing highball after a hot day at the lake.

It’s gin and tonic time! Try this refreshing highball after a hot day at the lake.

What prompted this post was a bottle of Parlour Gin, the latest spirit from Eau Claire Distillery near Turner Valley, Alta. This delightful London dry-style gin’s reputation preceded it, and Parlour Gin does not disappoint. It’s fragrant and flavourful, thanks to its unique combination of botanicals including saskatoon berries, rose hips, lemon peel and of course juniper berries, among others. It’s a gin that I call sippable; meaning, it tastes wonderful on its own over ice, but you can add a splash of tonic until you reach the desired level of bitter fizz.

Parlour Gin is one of the best gins I've had in awhile. I love the name (a nod to prohibition-era gin parlours) and the bottle's cool logo.

Parlour Gin is one of the best gins I’ve had in awhile. I love the name (a nod to prohibition-era gin parlours) and the bottle’s cool logo.

We have been experimenting with our Parlour Gin & Tonics this summer during trips to Fernie, BC, and we find that they taste best sipped on sunny patios after long hikes or lazy afternoons at the lake. Now that our bottle has finally run dry I think we have stumbled upon the best G&T recipe.

Parlour Gin & Tonic

  • 1-1/2 oz Parlour Gin
  • 3 oz tonic (or to taste) such as Fentimans or Porter’s
  • Squeeze lime
  • Lime circles garnish

In a rocks glass over ice add gin and tonic. Squeeze in 1/8 of a lime (or to taste), stir, and garnish with a couple of thinly sliced lime circles.

 

Drink of the Week: Elderflower G&T

Ever since returning from Africa I have been loving gin and tonics. The sundowner drink of choice (read more about sundowner cocktails in my next Calgary Herald column on Nov. 10), I became quite accustomed to my daily G&T whilst watching the sun set over Tanzania.

I didn’t always love them, however. Both tonic and gin are an acquired taste, I find, so adding a little something to soften the duo can help. A lot. Enter elderflower cordial to make an Elderflower G&T.

The elderflower cordial tones down the tonic and brings out the gin’s floral notes.

My friend Liz Tompkins introduced me to this lovely libation last week. She was camping this past summer with gal-pal Laura Jackson, who supplied the ingredients, and they enjoyed this civilized twist on a classic. I think you will, too.

Elderflower G&T

  • 1 oz Hendrick’s gin
  • 1/2 oz elderflower cordial
  • Top tonic (2-3 oz, to taste)
  • Squeeze lime
  • Ice

Build the drink in a rocks glass, stir, then add enough ice to fill the glass and chill the drink.

–Recipe courtesy Laura Jackson